Charles E. Irwin Jr.

MD

Chief, Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine
Adolescent medicine specialist
Devoted to classical music and traveling with family

Dr. Charles E. Irwin Jr. is an adolescent medicine specialist who serves as chief of the Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine and health policy director for the UCSF Department of Pediatrics.

In his research, Irwin studies how to improve preventive health screening in clinics as well as financial and structural barriers to health care access for adolescents. At UCSF, he heads the National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center and its national resource center, and co-leads its research network. He has led the federally funded Leadership Education in Adolescent Health training program since 1977. He has published more than 150 peer-reviewed manuscripts, chapters and reports on adolescent health.

Irwin earned his medical degree at the Dartmouth Geisel School of Medicine. At UCSF, he completed a residency in pediatrics and a fellowship in adolescent medicine.

Irwin's honors include the Adele Hofmann Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Academy of Pediatrics, Outstanding Achievement Award in Adolescent Health and Medicine from the Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine, Swedish Medical Society's International Lectureship Award, National Center for Youth Law's Award for Research in High-Risk Youth, and Maternal and Child Health Bureau's Lifetime Achievement Award.

Irwin is accepting new patients

  • Education

    UCSF School of Medicine, MD, 1971

  • Residencies

    UCSF, Pediatrics, 1973

  • Fellowships

    UCSF, Adolescent Medicine, 1977

  • Board Certifications

    Pediatrics, American Board of Pediatrics

  • Academic Title

    Professor

Clinics I work with (1)

adolescent-health-clinic-320x320-2x 5

Adolescent Health Clinic

Adolescent Health Clinic

San Francisco / Oakland

Where I see patients (1)

    Fetal surgery firsts

    The first open fetal surgery in the world was performed at UCSF in the early 1980s.

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