Lena Winestone, MD, MS

Pediatric hematologist-oncologist

Dr. Lena Winestone is a pediatric blood and bone marrow transplant specialist with a strong interest in caring for children with high-risk or relapsed leukemia or lymphoma. She has a focus on using novel immunotherapies – treatments that improve the body's own ability to fight cancer – so that patients with therapy-resistant leukemia can receive successful transplants.

Winestone's research explores racial, ethnic and socioeconomic disparities in children's access to leukemia treatment, including bone marrow transplant, and in their outcomes. Her top priority is ensuring that all children can get the best possible treatment as early as possible.

After earning a master's degree in chemistry from the University of Pennsylvania, Winestone earned her medical degree at Stanford University School of Medicine. She then completed a residency in pediatrics at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford and a fellowship in pediatric hematology and oncology at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. She also has a master's degree in health policy research from the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine.

Winestone is a member of the Children's Oncology Group, American Society for Transplantation and Cellular Therapy, and American Society of Hematology.

Before coming to UCSF, Winestone worked in a variety of places around the world, including Kenya, Lesotho, South Africa, Switzerland and Nepal. Outside of work, she enjoys pursuing outdoor activities in the Bay Area with her family and traveling abroad.

Clinics

Blood and Marrow Transplant Program
1975 Fourth St., Sixth Floor
San Francisco, CA 94158
Phone: (415) 476-2188
Fax: (415) 502-4867

Conditions & Treatments

More about Lena Winestone

Education

University of Pennsylvania, MS, Chemistry 2004
Stanford University School of Medicine 2009
Perelman School of Medicine, MS, Health Policy Research 2016

Residencies

Stanford Children's Health, Pediatrics 2012

Fellowships

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Pediatric Hematology and Oncology 2016

Selected Research and Publications

  1. Winestone LE, Punn R, Tamaresis JS, Buckingham J, Pinsky BA, Waggoner JJ, Kharbanda S. High human herpesvirus 6 viral load in pediatric allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients is associated with detection in end organs and high mortality. Pediatr Transplant. 2018 Mar; 22(2).
  2. Winestone LE, Getz KD, Miller TP, Li Y, Huang YS, Seif AE, Fisher BT, Aplenc R. Complications preceding early deaths in Black and White children with acute myeloid leukemia. Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2017 Dec; 64(12).
  3. Prince SD, Winestone LE, Nance SJ, Friedman DF. Recurrent Donath-Landsteiner hemolytic anemia: a pediatric case report. Transfusion. 2017 06; 57(6):1401-1406.
  4. Winestone LE, Getz KD, Miller TP, Wilkes JJ, Sack L, Li Y, Huang YS, Seif AE, Bagatell R, Fisher BT, Epstein AJ, Aplenc R. The role of acuity of illness at presentation in early mortality in black children with acute myeloid leukemia. Am J Hematol. 2017 Feb; 92(2):141-148.
  5. Chamberlain LJ, Pineda N, Winestone L, Saynina O, Rangaswami A, Link M, Wise PH. Increased utilization of pediatric specialty care: a population study of pediatric oncology inpatients in California. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2014 Mar; 36(2):99-107.
  6. Winestone LE, Bukusi EA, Cohen CR, Kwaro D, Schmidt NC, Turan JM. Acceptability and feasibility of integration of HIV care services into antenatal clinics in rural Kenya: a qualitative provider interview study. Glob Public Health. 2012; 7(2):149-63.
  7. Bernstein WB, Cox JH, Aronson NE, Tracy L, Schlienger K, Ratto-Kim S, Garner R, Cotte J, Zheng Z, Winestone L, Liebig C, Galley LM, Connors M, Birx DL, Carroll RG, Levine BL. Immune reconstitution following autologous transfers of CD3/CD28 stimulated CD4(+) T cells to HIV-infected persons. Clin Immunol. 2004 Jun; 111(3):262-74.

Publications are derived from MEDLINE/PubMed and provided by UCSF Profiles, a service of the Clinical & Translational Science Institute (CTSI) at UCSF. Researchers can make corrections and additions to their publications by logging on to UCSF Profiles.