Dr. Bennett Leventhal is a psychiatrist who specializes in autism spectrum disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and disruptive behavior disorders. As an advocate for children's mental health, he is devoted to enhancing the lives of children and families not only through patient care but also through working to influence policy and practice.

Leventhal has directed a number of initiatives to advance cutting-edge translational research – translating study findings into treatments and prevention – on psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents. His research focuses on disruptions in brain development that interfere with social functioning, including the molecular genetics of autism and the prenatal origins of disruptive behavior disorders. His endeavors include developing research programs in integrated pediatric mental health services, pediatric psychopharmacology, bullying and epidemiology.

Leventhal earned his medical degree from Louisiana State University School of Medicine and completed a residency at Duke University Medical Center. He is a professor emeritus at the University of Chicago, a distinguished fellow of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry as well as the American Psychiatric Association, a specialty fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics and a fellow of the American Orthopsychiatric Association. He is a member of many professional organizations, including the American Association for the Advancement of Science, American College of Psychiatrists, South Florida Council for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Florida Psychiatric Society, Society for Research in Child Development and Society of Professors of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

  • Education

    Louisiana State University School of Medicine, MD, 1974

  • Residencies

    Duke Health, 1978

  • Fellowships

    Duke Health, 1977

  • Academic Title

    Professor

Where I see patients (2)

    Fetal surgery firsts

    The first open fetal surgery in the world was performed at UCSF in the early 1980s.

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